Volvo Twilight Car Competition Compromise

Posted on: November 26th, 2011 by Jason

Volvo have been celebrating the latest movie in The Twilight Saga. In Breaking Dawn Part 1 Edward and Bella are getting married and to coincide with this Volvo invited people to play their Journey to the Wedding game. There was a holiday to Rio de Janiero and Volvo S60 R-Design Car on offer as prizes – so not a bad competition to take part in.

Volvo Twilight

The concept of the competition was to get through the challenges in the fastest times possible. Unfortunately and as usually happens with game related competitions, there were issues with possible cheating. This obviously has been investigated as Volvo have sent out an email to entrants to explain. They were told that “unfortunately we have now discovered that the game programme has been accessed and compromised by unauthorised people”.

Volvo then explained that “it is now impossible for us to select a winner in the way we had planned. This would have been by awarding the prize to the entrant completing the challenge in the shortest time”. They go on to say “we have decided that the only fair and reasonable way to proceed is to enter all valid entries into a prize draw – excluding any we know to be fraudulent. This will give entrants a chance of winning the original grand prize of the tickets to Rio de Janeiro and a Volvo S60 T3 R-DESIGN”.

It’s a fair decision by Volvo and it’s good to see that they have reacted accordingly to problems with their promotion. Sadly all games – especially where high scores or fast times are required to win – get targeted by people looking to cheat. A promoter needs to be on the ball and make sure that all problems are resolved or even better don’t appear.

Volvo’s decision though could be because they perhaps don’t fancy the publicity surrounding a recent Nissan competition that took place for Australian residents. According to the Sydney Morning Herald – “Nissan Australia is embroiled in a social media storm after it awarded a free $20,000 car and $1250 voucher to personal friends of a staffer managing its Facebook competition”.

The reports suggest that Nissan believe they have ran their competition objectively and that it’s just pot luck (and a bit embarassing) that the winner happens to be a personal friend of the person looking after the social media side of things. These kind of explanations don’t always go down well with competition entrants who want fairer play as this Facebook thread reveals.

Many promotions actually state that their not open to friends or family of employees etc. and we think – especially in these days of social media where it’s quite easy to link people together – that they’re pretty sensible rules to include.

On the plus side these kind of issues are now starting to wake promoters up and making them start to think about their online competitions. They now know they need to be fair, they now are starting to spot cheats, voting problems and automated entries, and they’re now realising that issues can’t just be swept under the carpet. For those of us who want fair play then that’s good news!

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