Loquax Competitions Blog Review Of 2011 – Part 1

Posted on: December 27th, 2011 by Jason

The last 12 months, comping and Loquax wise, have been incredibly interesting. We’ve seen automated entry problems, cheating, vote problems, articles about compers, and even an article attacking Loquax! Before we consider what lies ahead in 2012, we thought we’d take a look back at some of our blogs from the last year.

2011 kicked off with our predictions for the year ahead. We predicted issues with Facebook, Twitter and Blog competitions – plus suggested that our 13th year was going to be a tough one! Little did we know just how right we’d be!

Automated entries have been a theme of our blog in 2011. We kicked this theme off by asking why do promoters still use entry by email. It’s the easiest way to receive bulk entries and therefore should be avoided as an entry mechanic. Voting competitions were highlighted with the good news that Orange had listened to concerns and opted to pick a winner by judging panel.

We ended January asking if it was time for Twitter to improve competition guidelines. We followed this up in February with some initial research into Twitter Competitions. It seemed to us that some promoters weren’t seeing all their entries. It’s something we’d like to revisit in 2012.

In February we also highlighted how to find possible low entry competitions on Loquax. Yes, they do exist! It’s worth noting that competitions that require a bit of effort will attract less entries. Something we alluded to when we wrote about losing your comping mojo.

March was a busy month! Promoveritas caused a few ripples in comping circles with their article on the rise of the professional comper. We responded with our own commentary, especially as Promoveritas completely overlooked the issue of automated entries! Unsurprising given that many brands also overlook them as we revealed in our call to ban automated entry services.

In our blogs we revealed some of the brands who’s competitions have been targeted. Plus, thanks to the help of our friends at Chocolate Reviews we were able to reveal email accounts that promoters should be looking out for when running competitions.

The Velvet Money Tree on Facebook was the location for a big hoohah in April. Some people were upset by accusations of fraudulent plays whilst others couldn’t locate the promotional packs. Whatever the rights and wrongs it was a demonstration of the kind of reaction a brand can get when their competition doesn’t go according to plan.

However, that reaction was nothing compared to the anger we felt in May and June of 2011 when MyComps, from Oxfordshire Press, posted a review of Loquax on their website. The article, which got rewritten, was deemed denigatory by ASA and removed.

This incident with Oxfordshire Press led us to take a closer look at them and we were surprised to learn about their link with an automated entry service (same Directors). Perhaps our blogs about them touched a raw nerve or two? Interestingly, later in the year MyComps wrote an article to justify automated entries, whilst Prize Draw Centre removed the sitenames from their “comps entered lists”, perhaps to make it harder to figure out which sites they target?

Back to May and another company changing their voting processs and another having fun with their choice of winners. Seabrooks Crisps revised their Goodbye Salt, Hello Flavour competition after compers had complained about the voting process. Success Is… was the title of the competition run by Phones4U, but the winning entries attracted some less than happy comments. However, it did demonstrate that a judged competition can cause the same kind of ructions that a voting one does.

One thing that really got on your nerves during 2011 was the sob story! These often crop up during “tell me why you should win” competitions over on Facebook. We thought we’d try and lighten the mood a little bit with our sob story competition. We asked for sob stories to describe films, characters etc. and you came up with some funny and brilliant entries.

And that’s the first six months completed… the rest carries on in part 2.

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